Reforming Public Education

This is the first is what is undoubtedly a long series. It attempts to answer the question: how could you reform broken American institutions in a way that doesn’t become reminiscent of Paris in the summer of 1793? For the sake of simplicity, I imagine a capable monarch who is able to see reforms through over the course of decades and change systems incrementally.

National Maritime Museum, London, Greenwich Hospital Collection

If you pay taxes, you are spending roughly as much on government education as you are on the military. It pains me to say it, but we’re getting a better ROI from the DoD (don’t worry, I’ll have plenty to say about them in the future). Why is this? I’ll give you a few reasons, certainly not exhaustive, but a sufficient indictment of the whole system.

  • Teachers cannot teach in a way that they believe is the most effective way for them to educate the students in their classes.
  • There exists an incestuous monetary relationship between teacher’s unions and government officials, paid for with taxes.
  • Schools produce graduates who not only fail to learn academics, and fail to learn useful skills, but are also not socialized to living in America.
  • A university system that reduces math and critical thinking skills of students
  • Professors who are reduced to their ability to suck from the federal grant teat.

We’ve basically got not one, but two broken education systems in this country. K-12 and the university system. How do we fix these, over time, in a meaningful way.

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