Harvard Classics Volume 10: The Wealth of Nations

The foundational tome in economics, The Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith proved to be a worthwhile and interesting read for reasons the author didn’t intend. I’m going to get the one big complaint about this book right out of the way, if you’ve taken a course or even just an interest in economics, you have gotten the core message from The Wealth of Nations. In that sense, the book is a victim of its own success. Its ideas are embedded into discourse to this day, and the people who talk about economics in any serious way are familiar with his major points. To that extent, The Wealth of Nations is a book that would be extremely influential to a student in a great books program learning economics for the first time. It clearly states its ideas, and it gives mountains and mountains of evidence. There is so much in The Wealth of Nations, that the Harvard Classics uses an abridged version which cuts out much of the those mountains of evidence.
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